Sunday, February 18, 2018
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How to Analyse Movies #3: Mise-en-Scène & Editing

In the last part of How to Analyse Movies, we discussed signs, codes and conventions. In this chapter we’re moving on to the scene and editing, and what that means in film language. Everything you see in a film is constructed to fit on a screen.

How to Analyze Movies #3: Mise-en-Scène & Editing

In the last part of How to Analyse Movies, we discussed signs, codes and conventions. In this chapter we’re moving on to the scene and editing, and what that means in film language.

Everything you see in a film is constructed to fit on a screen. Filmmakers think about every element that is shown every shot, nothing is accidental. In general, of course, I’m leaving mistakes out of the equation.

By controlling what is shown in the boundaries of a screen, a filmmaker controls the understanding of the audience. All that the director puts into the scene and films is called the “mise-en-scène”.

The mise-en-scène is how a filmmaker creates meaning. They use it to develop a character, or give subtle hints about their nature; to set the mood, to increase realism or surrealism, or to explore the meanings of the film’s theme.


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Film Analysis For Beginners: How To Analyse Movies

Next in How To Analyse Movies:

You’re currently on part 3: Mise-en-Scène & Editing
Part 1: Introduction
Part 2: Signs, Codes & Conventions
Part 4: Considering the Camera
Part 5: Lighting, Sound & Score
Part 6: Story & Genre
Part 7: Iconography & Realisticness
Part 8: Putting it into Practice

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Manon is the founder and Editor in Chief of Film Inquiry. Originally a Dutchie, and having lived in Australia for 4 years, she now lives in Houston, TX. She has a Master's degree in Global Criminology, and is a screenwriter. Lives vicariously through film.

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